If you’ve only seen Back to Eden online, you’re missing some great Special Features

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I purchased Back to Eden on DVD back in January and am embarrassed to say that I only noticed today that there were Special Features on the DVD.

I bought the film online, but also had it saved to my Vimeo account (which I love, because I can watch saved videos from there on my Roku on my television set!), so I hadn’t bothered to actually put the DVD in to my DVD player. In fact, I only just recently got the DVD back after having loaned it out to someone. After all, I bought the DVD to support the film, and to let others borrow my copy of the DVD if they don’t have Internet access (like my grandparents).

In any case, this morning I wanted to watch a particular part of the film about the McOmber’s demonstration garden in Pennsylvania — to refer back to how they did something — and decided the DVD would be the easiest way to jump ahead to the part I was interested in watching. On the main menu, it mentioned Special Features, so I clicked on it right away, thinking it might just be a trailer and some written content — which is typical of many DVDs.

Boy, was I wrong! This DVD has some very valuable Special Features.

  • A complete Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section – These are available on the website, but it’s very convenient to have them on the DVD!
  • Paul Gautschi on pruning fruit trees
  • A segment on saving seeds
  • A dialogue with Dana Richardson and Sarah Zentz

So, I guess you could say that this post is just a plug to encourage people to buy the DVD.

What Dana Richardson and Sarah Zentz have done, along with producer Michael Barrett and, of course, Paul Gautschi, is to document on film the simplest, most sustainable and healthful methods for one of mankind’s most basic needs — the ability to feed his family. Applying the methods in this film, even on a small scale, will produce nutrient-dense food, and in a way that can be virtually free (by saving seeds, using wood chips that would otherwise be disposed of).

The film only costs $15, and that includes shipping. That is a real bargain! Click here to buy Back to Eden on DVD today.

I look forward to seeing a follow-up documentary in the next few years that shows how others have put Back to Eden methods to work in their own gardens and the success they’ve had. (Hint, hint to the filmmakers!)

don hinton March 29, 2012 at 2:29 pm

Will this method work in the southern climates of the USA? Southern Il, Mississippi, Florida, Georgia, Tenn, Mo? I see there are none in the upper mid western states. thank you.

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Sara Sara March 29, 2012 at 2:52 pm

It seems to be working for me, and I’m on the coast of North Carolina. One demonstration garden is in Pennsylvania, one is in southern California, and of course Paul Gautschi’s is in the Pacific northwest.

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